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Technology is the Root of All Evil

Technology has been used by others to exploit Africa for centuries. It is now time for Africa to grasp technology and finally embrace the modern age’s clay of wisdom and advancement, argues Philip Emeagwali

Ethnicity and tribalism: are these the root causes of the Sudanese civil conflicts?

Recent civil conflicts in Sudan, including in Darfur, have commonly been explained as clashes between competing ethnic groups. Pamela Paglia argues that this concentration on ethnicity as the primary cause for conflicts in Africa underestimates the complexity of African societies and politics.

Getting Our Priorities Right: Pan-continental government is not a substitute for reform.

The quest for a pan-African government is a diversion from the real challenges facing the people of continent, argues Ike Nnedu. African nations need better governments, not another layer of incompetent, rent-seeking politicians and bureaucrats.

Globalization still hurting poor nations 

More countries are now integrated into a global economic system in which trade and capital flow across borders with unprecedented energy. Nonetheless, argues Ravinder Rena, globalization has become painful, rather than controversial, to the developing world.

Rich countries and their leverage on Africa

Global demand for natural resources will bring benefits to Africa — increased FDI and improved balance of trade figures — but one of the main concerns is that the scramble for Africa is fuelling corruption, environmental degradation, and internal dissent, writes Ravinder Rena

When Will Ethiopia Invest in Ethiopia?

Ethiopia needs to invest more on manufacturing its own goods. The country has the resources to achieve this. What is lacking is the political will, argues Eleni Agiz.

Rich nation, poor citizens: The Missing Links for Increasing Output and Alleviating Poverty in Nigeria

Nigeria's economy is characterised by the paradox of poverty in the midst of abundance. Sa’idu Sulaiman outlines some measures for change to increase output and alleviate poverty in the country.

Nigeria and Her Membership of OPEC

Is Nigeria's membership of OPEC holding back the the development of its petroleum industry? Mobolaji E. Aluko calls for an imaginative and strategic re-thinking in this crucial sector.

Corruption in Nigeria: A New Paradigm for Effective Control

There are many unresolved problems in Nigeria, but the issue of the upsurge of corruption is troubling. And the damages it has done to the polity are astronomical, explains Victor Dike

African Countries Should Consider Basic Income Grants (BIG) For Their Citizens

African governments should consider Basic Income Grants (BIG) for their citizens as a way of dealing with poverty and stimulating economic development, argues Jackson Kariuki.

Alleviating Poverty in Nigeria

Despite enduring mass poverty in Nigeria, the attempts of successive governments to alleviate poverty have failed. Anthony Maduagwu contends that the much-heralded new anti-poverty programme of the present administration appears to be heading for the same fate, due to continued lack of transparency, inadequate planning, grassroots alienation and other fundamental problems that have hampered development in Africa's most populous nation.

The state of education in Nigeria and the health of the nation

The rehabilitation of the educational sector should be treated as a public health issue says Victor Dike because the survival of Nigeria as a viable society will depend on the health of her educational institutions, and how well the professors and support staff are treated.

Corruption in Nigeria: A New Paradigm for Effective Control. There are many unresolved problems in Nigeria, but the issue of the upsurge of corruption is troubling. And the damages it has done to the polity are astronomical, explains Victor Dike

African Countries Should Consider Basic Income Grants (BIG) For Their Citizens. African governments should consider Basic Income Grants (BIG) for their citizens as a way of dealing with poverty and stimulating economic development, argues Jackson Kariuki.

The State of Education in Nigeria and the health of the nation.  The rehabilitation of the educational sector should be treated as a public health issue says Victor Dike because the survival of Nigeria as a viable society will depend on the health of her educational institutions, and how well the professors and support staff are treated.

Assessing the future of Nigeria’s economy: ignored threats from the global climate change debacle. Global climate change is a reality that is unlikely to go away. Nigeria cannot afford to continue ignoring the potential negative impact on its oil-based economy. It should begin to take steps to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and endeavour to diversify its economy away from dependence on fossil fuels, in both production and consumption, argues Jekwu Ikeme.

A New African Initiative: Merger of the Millennium Partnership for the African Recovery Programme (MAP) and Omega Plan is the new master plan agreed by African leaders in July 2001 to eradicate poverty and place African nations on the path to sustainable growth and development within the context of globalisation.

The future lost: The economic and social consequences of child abuse in Africa. Child abuse is rampant in Africa. This growing oppression, from domestic servitude to outright slavery, is not only immoral explains Debbie Ariyo, but it is also undermining the continent's capacity to achieve economic growth and international competitiveness. 

The black (parallel) exchange market should be banned in Africa: Attempts by African governments to close the gap between official and parallel foreign exchange markets through market forces have almost invariably led to further cycles of parallel market depreciations followed by more official exchange devaluations. Mobolaji E. Aluko argues that outright ban of the black market is the most effective way to save Africa's currencies from the cycle of destabilizing devaluation.

Aids in Nigeria: the ticking time bomb: Nigeria is sitting on a ticking AIDS time bomb. Officially, the rate of HIV infection in Nigeria is about 5.4 percent, just slightly above the 5 percent trigger zone of AIDS Armageddon in any country. In reality, the estimated 3 million Nigerians living with HIV/AIDS are bigger than the population of many African nations.

Deconstructing the concept of human rights in Africa: While the promotion of human rights is important everywhere in the world, emphasis should also be given the concept of human responsibility. Kenneth Mwenda argues that in less individualistic societies, such as those in Africa and Asia, the promotion of social and individual responsibilities - for both the state and the individual - can help bring about a social order that may provide appropriate moral and ethical incentives necessary for social development.

Alleviating Poverty in Nigeria: Despite enduring mass poverty in Nigeria, the attempts of successive governments to alleviate poverty have failed. Anthony Maduagwu contends that the much-heralded new anti-poverty programme of the present administration appears to be heading for the same fate, due to continued lack of transparency, inadequate planning, grassroots alienation and other fundamental problems that have hampered development in Africa's most populous nation.  

HIV/AIDS in Africa: Less talk and more action: The HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa is the most devastating disaster to befall the continent. The ultimate responsibility for managing and eventually conquering this menace that threatens to destroy the social and economic sinews of  African societies lie with Africans, argues Dr. Chinua Akukwe

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